Skip to main content

FAQ

Q: Am I a good candidate for refractive surgery?
A: Patients who are at least 18 years of age, have healthy eyes that are free from retinal problems, corneal scars, and any eye diseases are generally suitable. Many patients who are nearsighted, farsighted or have astigmatism are potential candidates. We will also discuss your lifestyle needs to help you decide if LASIK is the best alternative for you. If you would like to schedule a free LASIK consultation, please contact our office.

Q: What is Orthokeratolgy (Ortho-K)?
A: Did you ever wish you could wake up in the morning being able to see perfectly? By wearing Ortho-K lenses nightly, you can correct your vision if you are nearsighted to close to perfect vision. Your eye doctor will fit you with GP lenses that gently correct the shape of the front of your eye when you sleep. The correction remains for a day or two, so you must continue to use the contacts nightly if you want to maintain good vision during the day. Interested in trying Ortho-K lenses? Book a consultation today.

Q: Who can wear ortho-k lenses?
A: People who suffer from nearsightedness will benefit the most from CRT, especially if your eye doctor does not recommend refractive surgery. Patients of any age can benefit from this treatment. Corneal reshaping lenses are especially useful for people who find eyeglasses and contact lenses inconvenient for various reasons. Some people find contacts hard to wear for an entire day, or don’t want to wear them while playing sports.People who suffer from dry eye syndrome or allergies have a hard time wearing contacts. Ortho-k is a perfect solution for anyone who can’t wear contact lenses, and don’t like the look or feel of eyeglasses.

Q: How does high blood pressure affect vision?
A: High blood pressure alone does not usually affect vision directly, however hypertension is a known risk factor in the onset and/or progression of other eye disease, such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and macular degeneration, as well as blocked veins and arteries in the retina or nerves of the eye that can severely affect vision. In malignant hypertension, very high blood pressure can damage organs, and may cause swelling of the macula and acute loss of vision.

Q: What is diabetic retinopathy?
A: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is an eye disease that can occur at any stage and with any type of diabetes. In fact, sometimes diabetes is identified during an eye exam in a person who never suspected it. It is caused by damage to the very delicate blood vessels within the retina at the back of the eye. As DR progresses, these blood vessels may start to leak blood and fluid into the retina or other areas of the eye, and new vessels may begin to grow within the retina, which can cause vision loss, and sudden complications including internal bleeds and retinal detachment.