Eye Care Hawaii

The eye is the jewel of the body.

- Henry David Thoreau

Aloha kakou!

Welcome to Eye Care Hawaii. With highly trained eye care specialists and a focus on Hilo, we view your eyes as windows not just to your health, but also to your culture, your environment, and how you experience the world.

With this in mind, we treat you and your eyes with uncompromising care and compassion. Our facilities feature state-of-the-art vision technology and procedures, while our doctors and staff ensure that every office visit, treatment, and follow-up is a positive experience for every patient.

Visit Eye Care Hawaii today and see how we can give you a clearer, brighter outlook on life.

Aloha!

 

 

FAQS

Below are a few of our most Frequently Asked Questions. If you have questions that are not addressed below or would like more information about our clinic, please contact us.

Send us a question! We'll answer it promptly.

Clinical FAQs

(Questions about your eye exam and eye health)

How often should I get an eye exam?

You should check your eyes on a yearly basis. Beyond simply checking your glasses, an eye exam is part of a healthy eye maintenance program. With regular exams, the chances of discovering irregularities or potentially harmful eye diseases are greatly improved.

 What is the difference between an ophthalmologist, optometrist, and optician?

A dental analogy works well for this question. An Ophthalmologist is an eye surgeon (similar to an oral surgeon). An Optometrist is your primary eye care provider (similar to your general dentist). An Optician dispenses glasses and contact lenses (similar to your dental hygienist). At Eye Care Hawaii, we are optometrists and opticians who provide primary eye care and evaluate and treat the majority of your eye care issues.

Why do you need to dilate my eyes? Can I drive after my eyes are dilated?

Enlarging the pupils gives the doctor a clearer view of structures inside the eye (retina, optic nerve, lens, etc). A dilated eye exam is a necessary part of a complete eye exam. Additionally, most patients can drive after their eyes are dilated. Side effects of the drops include blurriness mainly at close objects, light sensitivity, and some blurriness at distant objects. We also can partially reverse the dilation with another type of medication, if requested. If you are concerned about dilation side effects, however, you should have someone drive you after the exam.

When should my child have an eye exam?

Children should receive their first eye exam within the first year of life, or, at the latest, prior to starting any schooling. This early childhood exam entails a basic vision acuity check, ocular alignment exam, glasses exam, and ocular health exam.

Why do I need to be here with my child for the eye exam?

It is our policy that any child under 18 years of age must be accompanied by his/her parent or legal guardian. We often require parental authorization for special testing or medications. Moreover, the doctor can review the results of the eye exam and treatment plan with the parent when he or she is present.

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Optical FAQs

(Questions about your glasses and contact lenses)

Why is my prescription good only for one year?

Some people assume that because they see okay with a current pair of glasses their eyes are healthy. Unfortunately, this is not always the case – many eye diseases do not present with pain or vision loss until permanent damage is done (e.g., glaucoma). As eye care professionals, we cannot assume that because you see well your eyes are healthy; thus, yearly check ups are necessary. With this in mind, however, we may make exceptions for glasses prescriptions for established patients with no ocular health issues.

What is the difference between an ophthalmologist, optometrist, and optician?

A dental analogy works well for this question. An Ophthalmologist is an eye surgeon (similar to an oral surgeon). An Optometrist is your primary eye care provider (similar to your general dentist). An Optician dispenses glasses and contact lenses (similar to your dental hygienist). At Eye Care Hawaii, we are optometrists and opticians who provide primary eye care and evaluate and treat the majority of your eye care issues.

Can I wear contact lenses?

Most patients can wear contact lenses on at least a limited basis (several days per week) without experiencing problems. Contact lenses are medical devices, however, and can lead to discomfort or other medical issues in cases of dry eye, allergies, dirty environments, and “sensitive” reactions. Additionally, many other ocular and physical conditions, as well as medications, also can affect contact lens wear. To learn if contact lenses are right for you, please contact us.

Can I wear contact lenses if I have astigmatism?

Yes. With several soft and hard contact lens options, Eye Care Hawaii can find a contact lens solution for almost any patient with astigmatism.

I wear bifocals or need glasses to read; can I wear contacts?

Yes. We offer various solutions depending on the individual patient. For example, monovision is a long established form of contact lens use. The new bifocal lens designs also have been impressive. With either monovision or bifocal contact lenses, it is important to remember that your vision may not be as good as with glasses. For patients who are extremely detail oriented or require very sharp distance or near vision, contact lenses may not be the best option. With a full examination and assessment, Eye Care Hawaii can advise you on the best solution for your lifestyle.

Do you fit color contact lenses?

We have access to almost any contact lens. Our fitting technicians will listen to all of your preferences to help you choose the lens and color that best suits you and your lifestyle, while a Eye Care Hawaii doctor will evaluate the contact lens for fit and eye health. Please remember, however, that contact lenses are medical devices and may not be suitable for every patient.

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Administrative FAQs

(Questions about billing, payment, and insurance)

What insurance plans do you accept?

Eye Care Hawaii participates with most insurance plans - view list.

My insurance plan is not listed above; can I still visit the clinic?

Yes. For non-participating insurance plans, Eye Care Hawaii will complete and mail the insurance claim form for you. Reimbursement amounts vary per insurance type as long as “out of network” providers are allowed. Patients are required to pay for services at time of visit if we do not participate with their insurance plan.

We believe, however, that insurance plans should not dictate where you receive your vision and medical eye care, nor should they dictate how our clinic operates. We strive to provide quality eye care and to provide a comfortable, safe, and trusted environment for every patient. See our note about insurance for our opinion on this subject.

How often can I get an eye exam?

Vision insurance plans may limit participants to only one vision exam per year. You should be aware, however, that this limitation may not apply to your medical insurance plan and a medical eye exam may be obtained as required. For example, medical insurance typically will cover any eye exam where the patient presents with a complaint and a medical eye disease diagnosis. Also, medical insurance will cover nearly any exam if you present with a problem (blurred vision, eye irritation, previous eye disease, etc.)

What services are not covered by insurance?

Although most vision plans cover most services, a few procedures fall outside of this scope. For example, most insurance plans consider a contact lens evaluation as a non-covered procedure. As a result, an upfront payment would be required for this service. To verify what is covered under your specific insurance plan, please contact your carrier or review the eligibility and benefits information on your carrier’s web site.

What payment options do you have?

We accept cash, check, credit card (Visa, Discover, AMEX & Master Card), money orders, and traveler’s checks. If you are paying your statement, you also have the option to provide your credit card information on the form and mail it back to our office where we can apply the payment to your account. You may also call into our office and provide this same information over the phone to one of our staff members. We then will mail you a receipt of the credit card payment.

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For any other insurance or administrative questions please contact us or call (808) 935-8887 and request Chelsey Rodero, our Administration Manager.. For billing questions, please call Liza or Rose on Oahu at Physicians Billing Solutions. They are our outsourced Billing Company. Their phone number is (808) 677-7727. When calling, or when leaving a message, you will need to state that you are calling about your account at Eye Care Hawaii. Eye Care Hawaii looks forward to answering all of your questions.